Guli Silberstein           Artist-filmmaker, moving-image researcher and video editor, London-based

2015, UK, 4'02''

A symbiosis of human and nature forms, by direct manipulation of video code, purposely damaging it in ‘glitch’ process, creating rich explosions of colour and form. The images, a little girl in a flower field, Earth from space and bits of satellites, become vibrant substance, where the girl and the environment interact in a constant process of mutual consumption, reflecting poetic perception of existence.
“The machinic phylum is materiality, natural or artificial, both simultaneously; it is matter in movement, in flux, in variation”.
Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, "A Thousand Plateaus".

2006, Israel, 4'57''

Through distorted video signal, we see a happy family on one beach, as 100 km away a girl runs from the bombardment of another beach. The family is shown in a rapidly speeding stream of still images, while the girl is filmed in video, which is gradually taking more and more presence on the screen, creating a growing impact of shock and horror. The video work refers to the thin line between tranquility and chaos, and addressing the impossibility to fully grasp the Real, questioning media role in transferring reality.here.

Stuff As Dreams (trailer above)

2016, UK, 5'52''

Panicked news reports from scenes of terror that may or may not have happened, and family and travelling images that might have been a dream or maybe not, are intertwined into a painterly collage breaking-up and collapsing into itself, exploring both personal and public perceptions of an increasingly fractured world.
''Melted into air, into thin air...we are such stuff As dreams are made on.'' The Tempest, Shakespeare.



2005, UK/THE NETHERLNADS, 5'12''

The video depicts a dark and obscure world of perception, trying to capture the intangible, breaking away from the concrete notion of sight and sound, and creating an amplitude of cognitions, where attention is diverted to unexpected places: ‘As we move from the more conscious aspects of interpreting messages toward the more unconscious processes of perception we seem to be shifting our levels of abstraction from the more concrete towards the more abstract’ (Gregory Bateson).

2014, UK, 4'19''

A radiant, raging girl is shouting and punching the empty space in front of her. She is roughly cut out from her surroundings by a computer algorithm struggling to contain her, and her enemies are rubbed off the frame. Is she real? Is she a dream? Gradually, more fragments of the scene are revealed, and the context is made clearer. The video-processing highlights the documented scene as image, both of a fight for freedom, and a media event.

Moving Across Opposite Direction

2016, 06:15., UK

A chance meeting with a travel companion, gave birth to this trancelike work. Layers of rapidly moving British landscape, filmed using a high shutter-speed, from a high-speed train, and channels of sound, are overlapped and mashed-up. Going anywhere and nowhere at once, it's a reflection on time and space and what is in-between.

2007, Israel, 5'00''

Repetitive loops of images from the 1955 Hollywood film "The Ten Commandments", international TV news broadcasts reporting on war between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon, and a video documentation of a belly dancer in the desert. The images are synced up to a hardcore techno music track, creating an apocalyptic Middle East horror rave party, revealing the repetition of contradictions and pathologies in Middle Eastern, and generally human, myths and patterns of behaviour.
Music: Rude Awakening

One excerpt from a flow of Internet video news: a family is hiding behind a wall in a neighborhood that turned into a warzone. The compressed video is slowed down, enlarged, and accompanied by a new soundscape, revealing additional dimensions in the scene. The image is transformed into a psychedelic landscape, creating a troubling contrast between imagery and content, questioning video as medium, leading to an uneasy affect: anxiety deconstructed into pixels.

2013, UK/Israel, 4'16''

Breaking-up deesert images from the disputed Israeli-Palestinian region and electronic soundscape are integrated with a poem by the Israeli poet Yehuda Amichai read by the actress Gila Almagor in a recording found on YouTube. The video work is transmitting an urgent message to stop the continuing violence in the Middle East, highlighting the absurdity and pain of repeating human patterns of error, turmoil and destruction, and the difficulties of communication in a deaf, chaotic world.

2001-2003, USA/Israel, 5'25''

First project, made as a final project in M.A studies in Media Studies program at New School University, NYC, USA:
Two images on the TV screen: An Israeli soldier being lynched in Ramallah. A Palestinian child and his father being fired at in Gaza. How can horror be constructed in words? It's a schizophrenic situation - two sides trapped in a cycle of violence. Being in a personal schizophrenic state as well, watching this in New York - not here nor there. Are these images real?